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Emergency Preparedness Information

 

Welcome to the City of Takoma Park’s Emergency Preparedness Information Page.

The information contained on this page will be updated frequently particularly with ever-changing weather patterns caused by climate change. Plus the response to emergencies has also changed due to the COVID-19 pandemic that includes wearing a mask and social distancing.


About Takoma Park Alert

Takoma Park Alert will deliver important emergency alerts, notifications, and updates to you by the devices you choose and methods available.

Sign up now to be notified quickly of emergencies, severe weather, unexpected road closures, and other public safety incidents. Learn more about Takoma Park Emergency Alerts


Basic Emergency Supply Kit

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

  • Water one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food – at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio and an NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert
  • Flashlight
  • First aid kit
  • Extra batteries
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Copies of important documents, i.e. insurance papers, birth certificates, bills, medical insurance, etc..
  • Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery
  • Medications
  • Any special items you would need for the elderly, persons with disabilities, or for the very young

Suggested Kit:  A Go Bag

1. Basic electronics
Pack an extra phone charger in case you’re fortunate enough to have electricity, and a portable battery pack in case you’re not. Also, stash a long-lasting LED flashlight. Pack a small hand-cranked or battery-operated AM/FM radio (with extra batteries).

2. Personal needs
While getting ready for a typical day, list every toiletry you use, then buy a travel-size version of each. Pack backup eyeglasses, as well as a first-aid kit, baby wipes and a multipurpose tool with a knife and can opener.

3. Clothing
Pack a few days’ worth. Include layers you can add or remove, plus lightweight rain gear and waterproof boots.

4. Your meds
Pack about three days’ worth of each of your prescriptions, which should last until you can get to a pharmacy that’s open. If you need larger items, such as an oxygen tank, make sure you have a portable version.

5. The perfect bag
Think small and portable. A backpack is ideal, but a lightweight suitcase with wheels will also do. Just remember, you may literally be running with it.

6. Paperwork
Fill a zip-top waterproof bag with photocopies of your birth certificate; driver’s license; Social Security and Medicare cards; power of attorney and will; any marriage, adoption or naturalization certificates; proof of address; insurance, medical and immunization records; and information about your credit and ATM cards.

7. Food and drink
Bottled water is essential. Granola or energy bars are great because they are small and filling, and they come in a variety of flavors.

8. Cash
In addition to enough money for a few days, include small bills and a roll of quarters. If you need to buy something out of a vending machine, you don’t want to start asking equally desperate strangers for change.

The 2021 National Preparedness Month Theme

 “Prepare to Protect. Preparing for disasters is protecting everyone you love.” 

Weekly Themes for 2021

Week 1 September 1-4: Make A Plan

Talk to your friends and family about how you will communicate before, during, and after a disaster. Make sure to update your plan based on the Centers for Disease Control recommendations due to the coronavirus.

Week 2 September 5-11: Build A Kit

Gather supplies that will last for several days after a disaster for everyone living in your home.  Don’t forget to consider the unique needs each person or pet may have in case you have to evacuate quickly. Update your kits and supplies based on recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control.

Week 3 September 12-18: Prepare for Disasters

Limit the impacts that disasters have on you and your family.  Know the risk of disasters in your area and check your insurance coverage. Learn how to make your home stronger in the face of storms and other common hazards and act fast if you receive a local warning or alert.

Week 4 September 19-25: Teach Youth About Preparedness

Talk to your kids about preparing for emergencies and what to do in case you are separated. Reassure them by providing information about how they can get involved.

We encourage parents and caregivers to visit Ready.gov/plan to find tools and tips for making an emergency plan with their family.


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Emergency Preparedness Information Sections